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The Importance of Good Reasoning Skills for Resilience

Your mind loves to reason – it’s what many of us believe we’re best at!
Reasoning skills are a key factor in resilience and involve critical thinking, resourcefulness and problem-solving.
To be truly effective it also requires us to understand ourselves really well.
reasoning-of-resilience
Do you have a voice of reason?

Here are some questions to ask yourself – there are no wrong answers but the more honest you are with your answers the more benefit you’re going to get from it (even if the answer is “I have no idea”).

1. What are you good at?

Some people love doing detail, like budgeting. Others are “big picture” with broad brushstrokes, some are more “Let’s get started now and we’ll work it out as we go along” type people. And there are all kinds of variations in between. Do you know where you fit? What are you good at? How do you prefer to do things and what drives you crazy?

power-of-reasoning
tenacity-reset

2. Conversely, where do you need some help?

If I’m a person that’s good with the big picture and strategy, typically my best friends are those who love procedures and administration. Why? Between us we ‘make a good whole’. What skills complement the ones you have naturally? Where are your blind spots? Finding someone who balances that, whom you trust, is a great gift. It could be a mentor, a partner, a colleague or a trusted friend.

tenacity-reset

3. Do you know your beliefs
and values?

Explore and validate your current beliefs about yourself, your world and your current circumstances. As humans, we generally set up our belief systems by the time we are between the ages of four to seven, and are running our lives based on decisions made from a child’s perspective.

“I didn’t get what I wanted, so I’m going to be angry and sulk or make life difficult” 

Sound childish? That’s because it is.

developing-reasoning-for-resilience
Emotional maturity has us look at people and circumstances and not take responses personally, but to work through them to find the desired outcome.

4. What are your patterns of thought
and behaviour?

We find ourselves creating similar situations over and over again in our lives until we look deeper into why we are insisting on living the same pattern. The movie Groundhog Day plays it out beautifully.

5. How do you respond to things?

It helps to recognise that unexpected things happen. All the time. People die, jobs disappear, life changes – in an instant. 2020 has certainly highlighted that. Do you have the reasoning to prepare for, and adapt to unexpected circumstances? Just about everything is out of our control except how we respond to things.

4. What are your patterns of thought and behaviour?

We find ourselves creating similar situations over and over again in our lives until we look deeper into why we are insisting on living the same pattern. The movie Groundhog Day plays it out beautifully.

5. How do you respond to things?

It helps to recognise that unexpected things happen. All the time. People die, jobs disappear, life changes – in an instant. 2020 has certainly highlighted that. Do you have the reasoning to prepare for, and adapt to unexpected circumstances? Just about everything is out of our control except how we respond to things.

6. Are you prepared for the unexpected?

Taking precautions, planning, making decisions that protect yourself and your loved ones is sensible. Take action that looks after you and your world, then you can play the cards you are dealt – with more confidence. Sounds obvious doesn’t it? Simple even. It’s not.

plan-for-the-unexpected

7. What can you do now to relieve pressure and encourage good reasoning?

Do the little things that need to be done before they build into large issues – whether it’s going to the dentist, getting the car serviced, painting the house. Take action. Now is good.

Explore possibilities. Life changes. The way we do things now has changed dramatically from even ten years ago. Research and investigate. Ask questions. Be creative and open to new ways of doing things.

Reasoning, flexibility, and the willingness to adopt new solutions with confidence reduces stress and improves your resilience substantially.

People will say. “You are so lucky!”
“Yes I am, and, I’m prepared.”